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15 October 2005 at 07:33

delicious

Over at Cabbage Bliss, they are appealing for recipes, for a new book of postmodern recipes.

Here is a recipe they can use:

Take one large cabbage, shred it and stuff it in a large glass jar. Add 5 teaspoons of salt. Fill to the brim with water. Put on the lid, and store somewhere cool and dark for 3 weeks, while the natural fermentation happens.

After 3 weeks. Voila! Sauerkraut:



Warning - don't do what I did. I put the jar somewhere warm, to speed up the pickling process, but that encourages growth of the wrong kind of bacteria. I've had 20 years of flatulence as a result. Once those bugs get into your system, they never leave.

Mind you, for an antisocial basturn like hotboy, that could be a plus, a help in repelling flatheids. Everything balances up in the end.



Serving suggestion: sauerkraut with pig-blood sausage

Blogger Mary P. said...

I've just posted again at Heather's. I think I'll stop now, lest I offend anyone, but I've been really enjoying this topic.

I simply do NOT understand why people get all squeamish about this. The anonymous commenter said that she'd explained the various parts to her 4 year old daughter, even mentioning the clitoris, but "not without blushing furiously inwardly". Why? I don't get it.

I loved explaining this stuff to my kids, at the right time, in age-appropriate ways, because it is just plain interesting!! Isn't it interesting? Of course it is - it's fascinating! Why the miss-ish blushes? But I confess, this puts me out of step with a lot of women. (Sigh.)

Mary P

p.s. You can't seriously be saying you'd ever eat something that looked like that? Sauerkraut I love, but that other thing, wrapped around the outside? It looks just like a big, boiled (can I use the word on this blog?) c*k. Urgh. Guess I can be squeamish, after all!!  

~

Blogger Eric said...

I like bloodpudding (best referred to as "boudin"in French), but the presentatation on the plate makes it look like a colon; the ascending and transversing ,etc. parts are all there including, dare I say, the anus. Ugh!  

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Blogger robmcj said...

Mary - you can use any words you like here, except "Bush", a true obscenity.

Eric - the anus. Why didn't I think of that? German food will never taste the same again.  

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Blogger Eve O'Lution said...

Dear Rob McJay, thank you for your follow-up to my earlier comment. I am still having some difficulty in tracing the work of Ralwin. Can you "point me in the right direction"?

Best wishes, Eileen.

PS I emaile to the address you suggested, but the message was returned undelivered.  

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Blogger robmcj said...

Dear Eileen. Sorry for the mix-up, things have been a bit busy here recently.

The place I would recommend starting is here, where the latest paper is summarised (very briefly). There is also a overview of his main contribution to the discourse.

Let me know if this doesn't help, and we can work something out.

Best regards, Rob McJay.  

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Blogger Menzies Milngavie III said...

Wonderful news that Ralwin's Postulate is finally being picked up by the mainstream.

MM III  

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Blogger Heather said...

Now that you have mastered the art of saurkraut, I can teach you the secret of kimchi. That Korean delight that adds a dash of fish sauce and alot of cayenne to the fold to make a distinctly unique taste. The blood sausage part is not part of my food vocab...and I can only imagine the lovely aroma that accompanies it...  

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Blogger robmcj said...

Heather. Good news - a colleague at the McDonald Institute is researching the possibility of virtual smell reality, so a downloadable fart may not be far away.

MM - I agree with you completely. His years of work are finally getting recognition. What a pity he didn't live to see it.  

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Blogger Lee Ann said...

Rob, I am sorry to say that looks disgusting! I can handle a little bit of sauerkraut, but(t)not that other thing! eeewwwwhhhh! I don't even like regular sausage.  

~

Blogger Dynamic korea said...

Korea.net blue clothing kimchi
Contrary to a cool reception at home in the wake of a recent ruckus of its tarnished image, kimchi is gaining popularity with Americans and other places abroad following a spate of news reports to the effect that the traditional Korean dish has an inherent preventative effect on bird flu, the fear of which is now gripping the world.

It was last March that kimchi's curative effect on avian influenza began to be known well outside of the country, when the British public broadcaster BBC aired the results of a research team led by Seoul National University professor Kang Sa-wook.

Quoting the team's test results, BBC said of the 13 chickens stricken with the influenza, 11 had shown telling curative effects after being administered kimchi extracts.

Back in 2003, when the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) broke out in Asia, there was a ‘kimchi rage' in China and Southeast Asia on the strength of reports that the Korea-originated pickle was working in heading off the epidemic.

In recent weeks, the American media were into handling kimchi's efficacy in treating avian flu.

The ABC network, South Carolina's largest state newspaper, the Murtle Beach Sun News, Centre Daily Times of Pennsylvania, and some 100 media outlets across the United States reported kimchi's curative effects on the epidemic.

The ABC reported on Tuesday that with the interest in kimchi growing in America, sauerkraut, the U.S. version of kimchi, is also enjoying a boom. Sauerkraut, a pickle of German origin made from shredded cabbage fermented in brine, is normally inserted into hot dogs or sandwiches.

Journal Times, a publication from Racine, Wisconsin, reported scientists speculated that the bacteria which were detected in kimchi, help cure avian influenza, adding that the same strains were also discovered in sauerkraut.

Kim Jae-soo, the agricultural attaché to the Korean embassy in Washington, D.C., said that contrary to the perception of misgivings Koreans have at home, the American press has given an intense coverage of kimchi's curative effects on the poultry epidemic.
He noted that although the U.S. media had not paid significant attention to kimchi when it gained popularity as a curative to SARS in Southeast Asia, it is watching carefully this time around.

Meanwhile, according to the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry and the Korea Agro-Trade Corp. on Thursday (Nov. 10), despite the recent unsavory episode involving tainted kimchi, Korea's exports of the item amounted to 26,275 tons in the first 10 months of the year, up 81 tons from a year earlier.

In particular, shipments to Taiwan, Hong Kong and Malaysia have surged partly due to Hallyu, or the Korean cultural wave, prompted by Daejanggeum, a Korean TV drama aired in those countries. In the January-October period, exports to Taiwan totaled 561 tons, up 72 percent from a year before. Hong Kong and Malaysia saw their imports increase by 15 and 150 percent respectively.

Besides, prospects for suspended kimchi shipments to Japan to resume were bright as the Japanese authorities were about to end their investigation into the Korean products soon. About 93 percent of Korea's total exports of 34,827 tons last year went to Japan.  

~

Blogger Dynamic korea said...

Korea.net blue clothing kimchi
Contrary to a cool reception at home in the wake of a recent ruckus of its tarnished image, kimchi is gaining popularity with Americans and other places abroad following a spate of news reports to the effect that the traditional Korean dish has an inherent preventative effect on bird flu, the fear of which is now gripping the world.

It was last March that kimchi's curative effect on avian influenza began to be known well outside of the country, when the British public broadcaster BBC aired the results of a research team led by Seoul National University professor Kang Sa-wook.

Quoting the team's test results, BBC said of the 13 chickens stricken with the influenza, 11 had shown telling curative effects after being administered kimchi extracts.

Back in 2003, when the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) broke out in Asia, there was a ‘kimchi rage' in China and Southeast Asia on the strength of reports that the Korea-originated pickle was working in heading off the epidemic.

In recent weeks, the American media were into handling kimchi's efficacy in treating avian flu.

The ABC network, South Carolina's largest state newspaper, the Murtle Beach Sun News, Centre Daily Times of Pennsylvania, and some 100 media outlets across the United States reported kimchi's curative effects on the epidemic.

The ABC reported on Tuesday that with the interest in kimchi growing in America, sauerkraut, the U.S. version of kimchi, is also enjoying a boom. Sauerkraut, a pickle of German origin made from shredded cabbage fermented in brine, is normally inserted into hot dogs or sandwiches.

Journal Times, a publication from Racine, Wisconsin, reported scientists speculated that the bacteria which were detected in kimchi, help cure avian influenza, adding that the same strains were also discovered in sauerkraut.

Kim Jae-soo, the agricultural attaché to the Korean embassy in Washington, D.C., said that contrary to the perception of misgivings Koreans have at home, the American press has given an intense coverage of kimchi's curative effects on the poultry epidemic.
He noted that although the U.S. media had not paid significant attention to kimchi when it gained popularity as a curative to SARS in Southeast Asia, it is watching carefully this time around.

Meanwhile, according to the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry and the Korea Agro-Trade Corp. on Thursday (Nov. 10), despite the recent unsavory episode involving tainted kimchi, Korea's exports of the item amounted to 26,275 tons in the first 10 months of the year, up 81 tons from a year earlier.

In particular, shipments to Taiwan, Hong Kong and Malaysia have surged partly due to Hallyu, or the Korean cultural wave, prompted by Daejanggeum, a Korean TV drama aired in those countries. In the January-October period, exports to Taiwan totaled 561 tons, up 72 percent from a year before. Hong Kong and Malaysia saw their imports increase by 15 and 150 percent respectively.

Besides, prospects for suspended kimchi shipments to Japan to resume were bright as the Japanese authorities were about to end their investigation into the Korean products soon. About 93 percent of Korea's total exports of 34,827 tons last year went to Japan.  

~

Blogger Dynamic korea said...

Korea.net e food korean mail organic
Contrary to a cool reception at home in the wake of a recent ruckus of its tarnished image, kimchi is gaining popularity with Americans and other places abroad following a spate of news reports to the effect that the traditional Korean dish has an inherent preventative effect on bird flu, the fear of which is now gripping the world.

It was last March that kimchi's curative effect on avian influenza began to be known well outside of the country, when the British public broadcaster BBC aired the results of a research team led by Seoul National University professor Kang Sa-wook.

Quoting the team's test results, BBC said of the 13 chickens stricken with the influenza, 11 had shown telling curative effects after being administered kimchi extracts.

Back in 2003, when the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) broke out in Asia, there was a ‘kimchi rage' in China and Southeast Asia on the strength of reports that the Korea-originated pickle was working in heading off the epidemic.

In recent weeks, the American media were into handling kimchi's efficacy in treating avian flu.

The ABC network, South Carolina's largest state newspaper, the Murtle Beach Sun News, Centre Daily Times of Pennsylvania, and some 100 media outlets across the United States reported kimchi's curative effects on the epidemic.

The ABC reported on Tuesday that with the interest in kimchi growing in America, sauerkraut, the U.S. version of kimchi, is also enjoying a boom. Sauerkraut, a pickle of German origin made from shredded cabbage fermented in brine, is normally inserted into hot dogs or sandwiches.

Journal Times, a publication from Racine, Wisconsin, reported scientists speculated that the bacteria which were detected in kimchi, help cure avian influenza, adding that the same strains were also discovered in sauerkraut.

Kim Jae-soo, the agricultural attaché to the Korean embassy in Washington, D.C., said that contrary to the perception of misgivings Koreans have at home, the American press has given an intense coverage of kimchi's curative effects on the poultry epidemic.
He noted that although the U.S. media had not paid significant attention to kimchi when it gained popularity as a curative to SARS in Southeast Asia, it is watching carefully this time around.

Meanwhile, according to the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry and the Korea Agro-Trade Corp. on Thursday (Nov. 10), despite the recent unsavory episode involving tainted kimchi, Korea's exports of the item amounted to 26,275 tons in the first 10 months of the year, up 81 tons from a year earlier.

In particular, shipments to Taiwan, Hong Kong and Malaysia have surged partly due to Hallyu, or the Korean cultural wave, prompted by Daejanggeum, a Korean TV drama aired in those countries. In the January-October period, exports to Taiwan totaled 561 tons, up 72 percent from a year before. Hong Kong and Malaysia saw their imports increase by 15 and 150 percent respectively.

Besides, prospects for suspended kimchi shipments to Japan to resume were bright as the Japanese authorities were about to end their investigation into the Korean products soon. About 93 percent of Korea's total exports of 34,827 tons last year went to Japan.  

~

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